Why you shouldn’t become a Freemason.

This is a great post that every brother (and potential brother) should read at some point in their masonic careers.

Braden 168

Freemasonry  is shrouded in a pop-culture mystique of danger and intrigue. Now I won’t comment on if any of those intrigues are true (hint), but one thing is for sure,  Freemasonry has gotten a reputation as an organization in decline. This is very much not true.

Freemasonry is growing almost everywhere in exciting ways. Lodges are bringing in young, vibrant members, eager to learn traditions and add their own modern perspective. What is true, however, is that Freemasonry, along with every other fraternal club, saw huge booms in the twentieth century, and those boom times are gone. Frankly, those boom times were probably not that great for Freemasonry. They drew the focus away from self-improvement and brotherhood, and into more publicly-focused areas. Rather than helping each other grow better, many used their brotherhood to help each other grow richer. Charity became an industry, rather than a personal offer of relief…

View original post 910 more words

Advertisements
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The Lesson of The Garden Club

Let’s pretend, for a moment, that there exists a very old and well-respected gardening club that you’ve taken an interest in joining. This club tells potential members that it helps to make good gardeners better and they can become ‘master gardeners’ if they are willing to put in the work and advance in levels. You don’t mind the idea of doing work if you become a better gardener in the process,  so you petition for membership and gain admission. Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Masonic Improvement: Creating A Vision and Goals

In my previous post, I laid the groundwork for my series on lodge improvement. I wrote about what continuous improvement is and why it’s important but I never got into the details of implementation. Let’s dive in, shall we? Continue reading

Posted in Running A Masonic Lodge | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Best Practice For Masonic Improvement

Introduction

According to Wikipedia, A best practice is a method or technique that has been generally accepted as superior to any alternatives because it produces results that are superior to those achieved by other means or because it has become a standard way of doing things, e.g., a standard way of complying with legal or ethical requirements. Continue reading

Posted in Running A Masonic Lodge | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Getting Freemasonry Noticed

As a fraternity we do a lot of things hoping somebody will notice us.

The majority of the time we seek attention hoping that some men will approach us and ask for a petition. Bigger has to mean better, after all, and more members mean more dues and more brethren to help out with events. Continue reading

Posted in Freemasonry | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How Freemasonry Is (Or Used To Be) An Honor Group

I’m a huge fan of Brother Brett McKay’s website, The Art of Manliness. I have followed his website for several years and I can tell you, with no uncertainty, that I would not be the father, the man, or the Mason, that I am today had I not stumbled across his site when I needed it the most. When the student is ready, the teacher will appear, I suppose. Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | 2 Comments

Putting Quantity Before Quality:The Open West Gate

The West Gate is a term many masons may be unfamiliar with. I know here in Texas I have never heard of it until I began actively researching and collaborating with other masons from various jurisdictions online. In the physical sense, the West Gate is the door through which candidates and brethren enter to receive their degrees. In a more conceptual sense, the West Gate is much broader in definition and encompasses the entire process of receiving petitions, investigations, and voting on accepting and advancing new members. Continue reading

Posted in Freemasonry, Running A Masonic Lodge | 4 Comments